Skin cancer diagnoses are more common than you might think. An estimated 4.3 million cases of basal cell carcinoma are diagnosed in the U.S. each year resulting in more than 3,000 deaths. Squamous cell carcinoma is the second most common form of skin cancer with more than 1 million cases diagnosed in the US each year resulting in more than 15,000 deaths. Over 175,000 cases of melanoma — the most deadly cancer — will be diagnosed this year.

Your odds are higher than 1:100 in a year that you’ll be diagnosed with some form of skin cancer. The good news is that when caught early, these are highly treatable.

Related: Learn the signs of skin cancer.

We recommend both self-examination in addition to an annual skin scan by your dermatologist to find and address any spots that are concerning.

Let’s talk about the areas on the body where you’re most likely to see skin cancer occur.

1. Face

Your face is exposed to the sun practically every day of your life. It’s no wonder that this is the most common place to find skin cancer. The nose is the most common place on the face to see skin cancer. These cancers tend to be basal cell or squamous cell cancers. They’re usually identified early and as a result are typically easy to treat.

2. Scalp

As you might guess, balding men see more cancer on the scalp than people flowing locks. While this is true, anybody can get cancer on their scalp. Both melanoma and non-melanoma cancers are common. The easiest way to protect your scalp is to wear a hat.

3. Ears

Ears are the third most common place to find basal call carcinoma. Men tend to be more affected since they keep their hair shorter. Ball caps and hats that have a small brim leave ears exposed to the sun. Remember to use sunscreen on your ears and increase your protection by wearing a hat with at least a 3 inch brim.

4. Neck

The neck, specifically the back of the neck is like the face and scalp in that it gets sun daily. Stay safe by using an SPF 30 or higher on a daily basis, wearing a wide brimmed hat when outside, or if you have long hair wearing it down so your neck has some protection.

5. Hands

Don’t ignore a cut that doesn’t seem to heal or a dry patch that won’t go away on your hands. Those could be signs of squamous cell carcinoma. Get it checked by your dermatologist.

6. Chest and Back

In men, melanoma is most common on the trunk. It’s relatively easy to check your chest in the mirror but to do a thorough scan of your back requires another set of eyes. Either enlist the help of another person at home or schedule a skin scan with your dermatologist.

7. Legs

For women, melanoma is most common on the legs. When detected early it’s highly treatable. A great option for sun protection is to use a lotion with a minimum of SPF 15 every day. Be sure to get the backs of your legs, ankles, and feet as well.

8. Palms of the Hands, Soles of the Feet, and Nail Beds

These are all common areas for skin cancer if you have highly pigmented skin. Less so for Caucasian skin. Melanomas are rare for people of color but half of the melanomas that happen to people of color occur in these place. As these are difficult places to keep sunscreen on, it’s crucial to check these places regularly.

It’s important to remember that skin cancer is the most common form of cancer. It will affect 1 in 5 Americans in their lifetime. It’s also largely preventable. The best protection is to be proactive – wear sunscreen and protective clothing when possible. And schedule an annual skin scan with your dermatologist.

At Summit Plastic Surgery and Dermatology we’re the skin care specialists. Our highly trained dermatology providers will examine your skin and should skin cancer be found and removal necessary, our experienced Mohs Surgeon – Dr. Sica – will remove the cancerous cells while taking the least amount of healthy skin possible.

We have three locations: Wilmington, Supply, and Hampstead to serve you. Call (910) 794-5355 if you are concerned about any irregular spots on your body or to schedule your annual skin scan. It’s the easiest way to find and address any skin cancer issues while they are still highly treatable.

Skin cancer diagnoses are more common than you might think. An estimated 4.3 million cases of basal cell carcinoma are diagnosed in the U.S. each year resulting in more than 3,000 deaths. Squamous cell carcinoma is the second most common form of skin cancer with more than 1 million cases diagnosed in the US each year resulting in more than 15,000 deaths. Over 175,000 cases of melanoma — the most deadly cancer — will be diagnosed this year.

Your odds are higher than 1:100 in a year that you’ll be diagnosed with some form of skin cancer. The good news is that when caught early, these are highly treatable.

Related: Learn the signs of skin cancer.

We recommend both self-examination in addition to an annual skin scan by your dermatologist to find and address any spots that are concerning.

Let’s talk about the areas on the body where you’re most likely to see skin cancer occur.

1. Face

Your face is exposed to the sun practically every day of your life. It’s no wonder that this is the most common place to find skin cancer. The nose is the most common place on the face to see skin cancer. These cancers tend to be basal cell or squamous cell cancers. They’re usually identified early and as a result are typically easy to treat.

2. Scalp

As you might guess, balding men see more cancer on the scalp than people flowing locks. While this is true, anybody can get cancer on their scalp. Both melanoma and non-melanoma cancers are common. The easiest way to protect your scalp is to wear a hat.

3. Ears

Ears are the third most common place to find basal call carcinoma. Men tend to be more affected since they keep their hair shorter. Ball caps and hats that have a small brim leave ears exposed to the sun. Remember to use sunscreen on your ears and increase your protection by wearing a hat with at least a 3 inch brim.

4. Neck

The neck, specifically the back of the neck is like the face and scalp in that it gets sun daily. Stay safe by using an SPF 30 or higher on a daily basis, wearing a wide brimmed hat when outside, or if you have long hair wearing it down so your neck has some protection.

5. Hands

Don’t ignore a cut that doesn’t seem to heal or a dry patch that won’t go away on your hands. Those could be signs of squamous cell carcinoma. Get it checked by your dermatologist.

6. Chest and Back

In men, melanoma is most common on the trunk. It’s relatively easy to check your chest in the mirror but to do a thorough scan of your back requires another set of eyes. Either enlist the help of another person at home or schedule a skin scan with your dermatologist.

7. Legs

For women, melanoma is most common on the legs. When detected early it’s highly treatable. A great option for sun protection is to use a lotion with a minimum of SPF 15 every day. Be sure to get the backs of your legs, ankles, and feet as well.

8. Palms of the Hands, Soles of the Feet, and Nail Beds

These are all common areas for skin cancer if you have highly pigmented skin. Less so for Caucasian skin. Melanomas are rare for people of color but half of the melanomas that happen to people of color occur in these place. As these are difficult places to keep sunscreen on, it’s crucial to check these places regularly.

It’s important to remember that skin cancer is the most common form of cancer. It will affect 1 in 5 Americans in their lifetime. It’s also largely preventable. The best protection is to be proactive – wear sunscreen and protective clothing when possible. And schedule an annual skin scan with your dermatologist.

At Summit Plastic Surgery and Dermatology we’re the skin care specialists. Our highly trained dermatology providers will examine your skin and should skin cancer be found and removal necessary, our experienced Mohs Surgeon – Dr. Sica – will remove the cancerous cells while taking the least amount of healthy skin possible.

We have three locations: Wilmington, Supply, and Hampstead to serve you. Call (910) 794-5355 if you are concerned about any irregular spots on your body or to schedule your annual skin scan. It’s the easiest way to find and address any skin cancer issues while they are still highly treatable.

Love the skin you're in! Schedule your skin checkup now!

Make sure you don’t have any spots, moles, or rough patches of skin that need attention before spring and summer gets here!

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